Social Studies

GLOBAL HISTORY I AND II (HGS41 & HGS42)
Credits: 1 credit/semester
Grade(s): 9
Length of Course: 2 semesters
Prerequisite: None
Requirement Satisfied: Global History

Global I and II is a one year course that starts with the Pre-historic times and ends with the Age of Absolutism. The course is divided by Topic chronologically in order to follow the New York State Curriculum for Global Studies. At the end of this course, you will be able to answer all of the daily Aims, define the essential vocabulary, and apply the relevant concepts.


GLOBAL HISTORY III AND IV (HGS43 & HGS44)
Credits: 1 credit/semester
Grade(s): 10
Length of Course: 2 semesters
Prerequisite: Global I and II
Requirement Satisfied: Global History

This course deals with world history from The Scientific Revolution to the present. The purpose of the course is to help students understand world events and themes from a global context. During the term we will pay attention to changes in ideas, culture, attitudes, technology, and society in general. The impact of these changes is studied in relation to political, economic, and social decisions. This course is divided into different units, each with its own theme. This course terminates with the Global History Regents in June.


US HISTORY I AND II (HUS21 & HUS22)
Credits: 1 credit/semester
Grade(s): 11
Length of Course: 2 semesters
Prerequisite: None
Requirement Satisfied: American History & Government

U.S. History I & II is a one-year survey course that covers topics in American history from the Colonial Period (early 1600s) through World War I (1918). Emphasis is placed on our Constitutional foundations and the effectiveness of this system of government throughout this time period. Students will continue to develop thematic and document based essay writing skills. The two courses are prerequisites to U.S. History III.


US HISTORY III/GOVERNMENT (HVS11)
Credits: 1 credit/semester
Grade(s): 12
Length of Course: 1 semester
Prerequisite: US History III and Government I
Requirement Satisfied: American History & Government

U.S History III/US Government incorporates the following topics in US History with an emphasis on the role of government at the federal, state and local levels: The Politics of the Roaring Twenties, the Great Depression and the New Deal, World War II, The Cold War, the Postwar Boom, the Korean War, Civil Rights, The Vietnam War, An Era of Social Change, The Conservative Tide, and The United States in Today’s World. US Government includes the principles of Democracy and the foundations of US Government, political behavior, comparative political and economic systems, as well as state and local governments. Students will take the U.S. History Regents in January.


ECONOMICS (HES11)
Credits: 1 credit/semester
Grade(s): 12
Length of Course: 1 semester
Prerequisite: US History and Government I and II
Requirement Satisfied: Economics

Students will study the following: Economic Systems, American Free Enterprise, Supply and Demand, Market Structures, Business Organizations, Labor, Financial Markets, Introductory Macroeconomics, Taxation and Spending, Fiscal Policy, International Trade, and Economic Development and Transitions. Students will learn to analyze and critique economic systems, processes, as well as policy. Personal financial awareness is also taught to prepare students for independent adulthood. This course is offered to all students during the Spring semester of their senior year.


AP Courses

AP WORLD HISTORY (HGS43X & HGS44X)
Credits: 1 credit/semester
Grade(s): 10
Length of Course: 2 semesters
Prerequisite: Global I and II
Requirement Satisfied: Global History

AP World History is designed for qualified students who wish to complete studies in secondary school equivalent to an introductory college course in world history. The purpose of this course is to develop greater understanding of the evolution of global processes and contacts in different types of human societies. The course highlights the nature of changes in global frameworks and their causes and consequences, as well as comparisons among major societies. It emphasizes relevant factual knowledge, leading interpretive issues, and skills in analyzing types of historical evidence. Students will be required take the AP World History test in May.


AP US HISTORY (HUS21X & HUS22X)
Credits: 1 credit/semester
Grade(s): 11
Length of Course: 2 semesters
Prerequisite: US History and Government I and II
Requirement Satisfied: American History & Government

Advanced Placement United States History is an academically rigorous, chronological and thematic survey course spanning the entirety of United States history from 1492 to the present day. The Advance Placement course is designed to provide students with the analytical skills and factual knowledge critical to dealing with the problems and issues inherent throughout United States history. Students will learn to assess historical materials, their relevance to a given interpretive problem, and their reliability and significance. The course will emphasize key themes in United States history including national and ethnic diversity, identity and culture, demographic changes, economic transformations and trade patterns, the environment, globalization and international relations, politics, reform, religion, slavery and labor systems, war and diplomacy. Students are required to the Advanced Placement test in May.


Electives

HISTORY OF FILM (HRS11)
Credits: 1 credit/semester
Grade(s): 11, 12
Length of Course: 1 semester
Prerequisite: None
Requirement Satisfied: Elective

This course examines the history of the film industry, focusing on its impact on the American culture and society. Students will critically analyze how human cultural and social conflicts are portrayed and resolved in popular films. By watching, discussing and writing about these films, students will examine how motion pictures create a window into American culture and how it helps us better understand history in a social and cultural context. This course also offers the opportunity to examine historical events through the "History VS Hollywood" prism.


CONSTITUTIONAL LAW (HLS11)
Credits: 1 credit/semester
Grade(s): 10, 11, 12
Length of Course: 1 semester
Prerequisite: US History and Government I and II
Requirement Satisfied: Elective

This introductory course focuses on the issues raised by the structural parts of the United States Constitution. Consideration will be given to judicial processes in constitutional cases; judicial review; and the federal courts functioning in the constitutional system. Attention will then be given to the relationships of the three federal branches of government, with emphasis on some of the powers and limitations of the executive, legislative and judicial bodies that arise from principles of separation of powers and national checks and balances. Federalism and the respective roles of the national and state governments are addressed in some detail.


CONTEMPORARY HISTORY (HUS11)
Credits: 1 credit/semester
Grade(s): 12
Length of Course: 1 semester
Prerequisite: US History I and II
Requirement Satisfied: Elective

This course is a special topics course which addresses contemporary history from 1945 to present. Students will examine historical events using primary sources to analyze the precursors, events, and their historical implications. Particular detail will focus upon American history and its implications for social, political and economic changes. The interdependence of these three variables will be a theme that runs through the course. Students will be required to make class presentations on select topics.


WORLD HISTORY THOUGH LITERATURE (HQS11QPL)
Credits: 1 credit/semester
Grade(s): 10
Length of Course: 1 semester
Prerequisite: Global I and II
Graduation Requirement Satisfied: Elective

This course presents a study of the development of world literature from ancient times through the present. With emphasis on major authors and literary trends, all forms of literature will be covered, including poetry, prose, and drama. The course emphasizes the study and consideration of the literary, cultural, and human significance of selected great works of the Western and non-Western literary traditions, including women's, minority, and ethnic literature from around the world. An important goal of the class is to promote an understanding of the works in their cultural/historical contexts and of the enduring human values which unite the different literary traditions.